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Are The Disses Doing too Much?

When will the diss tracks between Drake and Kendrick Lamar stop?

The world of hip-hop is no stranger to beef between artists, but when it comes to Kendrick Lamar and Drake, their ongoing feud has reached new heights, with diss tracks flying back and forth.

According to Time, the long-standing beef between two of the most influential rappers, dating to 2013, has recently escalated with a cycle of diss tracks.

The first round began when Drake’s song, “First Person Shooter,” featuring J. Cole refers to Drake, Lamar, and J. Cole as the “Big Three” of rap, igniting Lamar’s irritation. He retaliated against that title on Future’s track, “Like That” (March 22), taking aim at Drake’s skill level, Lamar saying, “Motherf*ck the big three, it’s just big me.”

Adding fuel to the fire, J. Cole unexpectedly released a diss towards Lamar on his EP, Might Delete Later, insinuating that Lamar’s raps were only relevant during rap beefs. However, Cole later distanced himself from the feud by deleting the diss track and issuing a public apology.

Only one left to respond was Drake as he fired back with not one but two diss tracks, targeting Lamar and other artists on songs “Push Ups” and “Taylor Made Freestyle” (April 19). Lamar’s response on April 30th, “Euphoria,” criticized Drake’s language choices like using the n-word too much but avoided getting deeply personal.

The viral verse “I hate the way that you walk, the way that you talk/ I hate the way that you dress/ I hate the way that you sneak dissing/ If I flight it’s gonna be direct/ We hate the b-tches you f–ck because they confuse themselves with real women,” came into fruition.

You’d think this rap beef would settle itself but then Drake released “Family Matters,” making serious allegations against Lamar, including claims of abuse towards his fiancée. Immediately, Lamar came back with “Meet the Grahams,” with personal attacks against Drake, including allegations about his personal life. Not even 24 hours later Lamar released another song, “Not Like Us” with the cover art being a photo of Drake’s Toronto mansion with red markers similar to the ones used to mark the homes of sexual offenders.

The feud took a wild turn when Drake’s Toronto mansion was targeted in a drive-by shooting on May 7th, leaving his security guard critically injured according to The New York Times. More attempts by trespassers to visit Drake’s home further caused concerns for both artists’ safety. On May 9th another trespasser attempted to visit Drake’s Manson, according to TMZ. Lastly, this past Saturday, a third person was intercepted and detained by security.

South Side resident Javion Turner says, “They should keep the beef in the booth if that’s the case, but I don’t think the two have any connection.”

It hasn’t been confirmed this is connected to the rap feud, but if so, while rap beef is common in the industry, the recent events should serve as a reminder of the potential consequences when personal vendettas from music become real-life threats. Artists need to remember the distinction between artistic expression and real dangers. As the situation unfolds, Lamar and Drake should prioritize their safety and well-being over musical dominance.

 

By Jayla Johnson, Illinois State University Alum

Instagram: Jaylalj_

 

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Written by Jayla Johnson

Jayla Johnson is an Illinois State University alumni and blogger for her own website JJMedia, which spotlights digital creations and interviews people in the field.

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