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Hulu Doc Gives History of Freaknik

Everybody’s parents who attended an HBCU are tuning in to Hulu’s documentary Freaknik: The Wildest Party Never Told to make sure they’re not featured in. Held annually in the spring, Freaknik’s origin dates back to Atlanta, Georgia in the 1990s. Picture lots of music blasting out of cars and extremely short shorts – sounds like a time, doesn’t it?

Origin of Freaknik

Freaknik started as a simple Black college cookout for Atlanta HBCU students during spring break and evolved into a timeless, huge cultural phenomenon that brought people together.

Soon, the popularity spread far beyond the Atlanta University Center (AUC), attracting students and people from just about anywhere. Atlanta, is home to some of the most influential hip-hop artists like Outkast and Soulja Boy and some of our generation’s favorites like Future and Young Thug. The music scene played a huge role in shaping Freaknik.

People like Luther Campbell, also known as Miami’s Uncle Luke, played an essential role in the spread of the Black cultural gathering, by bringing attention to Freaknik and contributing to its wild reputation.

Wildest Freaknik Moments

As seen in the documentary, some wild moments took place during the infamous festival. With the expansion of Freaknik came a lack of control – which resulted in the legendary Atlanta Freaknik traffic. Cars were bumper to bumper and people danced on top of those cars. Freaknik was the epitome of expression and freedom. The documentary showcases footage captured from people flashing the camera to dance-offs in the street. Freaknik – the celebration of Black joy – is remembered as nothing short of exciting yet chaotic.

Ultimately, all great things reach their peak. Unfortunately, the rise of Freaknik pretty much led to its fall. The documentary explored how Freaknik eventually faced challenges, such as worsened traffic congestion, public safety issues, and lack of crowd control, which led to the demise of Freaknik in 2010, where Atlanta police and officials collaborated on banning the celebration.

Despite the downfall, Freaknik left a profound mark on Atlanta in both musical and cultural aspects. The Hulu documentary perfectly captured the long-lasting legacy and the good parts of the festival and youth culture while simultaneously highlighting the areas that needed improvement during such an iconic time in Black culture. Freaknik has and will go down in history as an influence on even the biggest street parties and will be remembered by many as a representation of young Black joy and freedom.

 

By Journey Powell, Freshman, Spelman College

Instagram: journeyaliah

 

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Written by Journey

Hiii, I’m Journey. I love to model and write poetry. My favorite movie series is Harry Potter.

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